Saturday, October 1, 2011

The Golden Isles

Mac took me on a birthday trip yesterday to Jekyll Island one of Georgia's Golden Isles.  The Isles are made up of 4 barrier islands: St. Simons, Sea Island, Jekyll, Little St. Simons.  We've been to St. Simons twice, and though I really like it I wanted to go somewhere different.
We had a picture perfect day for walking, painting and fishing.   We both walked, I painted, Mac fished.  He caught 5 fish, I painted a really bad painting that I'm going to have to fix some how.
Jekyll is a small island  about 7 miles long by 1.5 miles wide and is owned by the state of Georgia, people living there lease the land for their houses  from the state.  The state plans on keeping at least 65% of the island as a nature preserve and I think that's wonderful.   There are biking paths every where, you can rent horses to ride on the beach or you can walk, what could be better?

Salt marshes cover much of the island

Driftwood beach

Fishing pier


Live oaks every whree
We went to the north end of the island to Driftwood beach which is noted for its huge stands of pine and live oak roots scattered about the beach.  Unfortunately the tide was in when we first got there and it took a while for it to go out enough to be able to really appreciate the beauty of it all.
For film buffs parts of X-Men First Class, Glory, and the Legend of Beggar Vance were filmed on the island.

3 comments:

  1. What a glorious day you spent on Jeckyl.

    It is a truly beautiful and peaceful spot and wonderful that you both found what you most wanted to do.

    My best for a beautiful weekend
    Helen xx

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  2. Jekyll looks a really lovely place for a day out. I like the fact that the State of Georgia is keeping such a large area as a nature preserve - well done them!

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  3. Jekyll Island looks to be an idyllic place for a visit. So good to see the former shipbuilder's tree Live Oak (Quercus virginia) the evergreen oak growing so profusely and no wonder that they have created a Nature Reserve because europe once had whole forests of these trees and now only a few remain - there is just one growing in the grounds of Glastonbury Abbey, Somerset UK.

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