Friday, June 23, 2017

Sweating Cobs

I wonder where that expression came from.  I know it's hotter out west--temps in the 100's-- but it's so humid here they said it was going to feel like 102º and it does.  Or more.  I have hung our a load of laundry and cleaned the kitchen, Mac did the dishes bless his heart. and I'm literally dripping in sweat.  I refuse to turn the air conditioner on this early, it's just 10:34, so all I can do is sit under a fan.  I'll be going in the pool as soon as the man who's cleaning our gutters is done.  We found someone to do it, he showed up on time and he's almost done.    Maybe I can get a swim in before today's storms start.  I missed swimming yesterday because we went grocery shopping and it was late when we got back.
We finished wrapping our daughter's birthday gifts, weighing them, filling in the custom's forms and screaming when we saw how expensive it was going to be.  Good thing she's worth it.
The rest of the day is mine, but in this kind of weather I won't be doing much.  Steak sandwiches with asparagus for lunch.
Have a good weekend.
Looked up that expression "sweating cobs" and most sources think it's English in origin, Lancashire region, and has to do with round bread (cobs) rising and sweating.

21 comments:

  1. I've never heard of sweating cobs but Paul had a good laugh over the cartoon. This is the man who has popcorn just about every night of his life! Hothothot

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    1. here too. (I wasn't done yet.) Our air has been coming on about 8:30 am. You're tough!

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  2. I love that cartoon! I've never heard that expression, sweating cobs. The humidity here has been awful too. I can't stay outside ten minutes without sweat running in my eyes and my hair sticking to the back of my neck. It's miserable!!

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  3. Odd how we think of corn right away with that expression. Of course, I have no idea how a web would sweat. I didn't have an inkling that it was concerning round bread.

    Raining here, humid air, uncomfortable.

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  4. I love the cartoon!
    Sorry you are having it so hot and humid ...our very hot spell in the UK has gone, for which I'm grateful.

    All the best Jan

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  5. I've never heard that expression. It's raining here. Far too much.

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  6. It's dusk here and I've just been outside, it's wonderfully cool. The house is still hot inside because the stone walls keep the heat in.

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  7. We had a high of about 58 today briefly now it is colder:)

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  8. Our weather out here has gotten a bit cooler thank goodness but I feel for you and the high humidity. We too try to not use our A/C but sometimes you have to cool off a bit! Stay cool and I hope the bad storms are gone. Pat xx

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  9. So hot here. High 90s. Humidity 'only' 41%. Today was one of those days I call 'the convection oven.'

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  10. Sweating cobs is a phrase that we use a lot, despite saying it I had no idea of its origins. So very nice to learn something new.

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  11. I always thought sweating cobs meant sweat balls were the size of cobs. UK still cool and no sunshine.

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  12. Ah yes, sweating cobs. It's funny when you hear the origin of a phrase when you've heard it so many times yet never wondered where it comes from or what it means. Interesting to know that. The post here is really expensive too, it seems there's increases every couple of months, I dread to think how much you had to pay to ship a parcel to Japan.

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  13. You don't turn on the AC in the morning? *Gasps* Ours has been on without interruptions since April. We turn the thermostat up to 79º while we are out at work, but it's always on.

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  14. Nope. Never ever heard that expression. But I love that you supplied us with a possible answer as to where it came from. Hope it gets cooler for you.

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  15. Never heard of sweating cobs but I should have if it is English!
    Not the part of England that I know, so I guess that makes sense!
    Love the cartoon.

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  16. Our air is on almost year round, it is horrible out. Hope you cool off.

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  17. Cobs are indeed loaves but they don't sweat. I've never heard the expression but would think it more likely that it refers to the fact that they're round loaves, so I suppose large drops of sweat might look a bit like that.

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  18. Steak sandwiches with asparagus sounds good :-)

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  19. I have come to the conclusion (because our air conditioner can run day and night) that comfort is needed to get through the extreme heat. I don't like the electricity bills and I could put us on the equalizer plan where you pay the same every month regardless of usage (and they recalculate yearly to see if the amount goes down) but I like the cheaper months of electricity so it outweighs the about 3-4 months of high bills. We keep our air conditioning at 78, I up it to 80 during the day when I'm alone here working. Hubby has more trouble with the heat so he's comfortable at 78, a bit miserable at 80 inside the house. Since he is the main provider and provides well, its worth keeping it at 78 when he is around. There is that factor too of humidity. With it being so low here, 120 feels like 120, not higher based on humidity. Stay as cool as you can!!!

    betty

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  20. This is really quite informative blog such qualitative info I have never seen anywhere.

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